a fool in the forest

Epigraphs

  • A fool, a fool! I met a fool i' the
        forest,
    A motley fool; a miserable world!
    As I do live by food, I met a fool
    Who laid him down and bask'd him
        in the sun,
    And rail'd on Lady Fortune in good
        terms,
    In good set terms and yet a motley
        fool.

    As You Like It,
    Act II, Scene 7

    L'homme y passe à travers des
        forêts de symboles
    Qui l'observent avec des regards
        familiers.

    Les Fleurs du Mal,
    “Correspondances”

    [T]here is almost no subject-matter, and what little one can disentangle is foolish....
    One would call the style verbose, except that by definition verbosity is the use of words in excess of the occasion, and there seems to be no occasion.

    Yvor Winters,
    Forms of Discovery, Ch. 7


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    « Epithalamium Redux Redux | Main | Living la Muerte de Lorca [Ainadamar, Long Beach Opera] »

    May 18, 2012

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    Comments

    Chris McGovern

    Hey George, great review, and I agree with Will's statements as well.
    I'm writing my own review of the record as well (Thanks NPR), so be on the lookout for that! :)

    Jonathan

    Hell of a review, all the more excitable the record, cheers.

    Susan Scheid

    I do find this an interesting project, no question, and enjoyed both yours and Robin's takes on it. Puts me in mind of a post by Andrew Lee at I Care If You Listen, about performers as co-composers. I do like the concept (after all, I was brought up on jazz), and I certainly can understand the desire of classical performers to break out of the traditional box. On the other hand, I'll have to confess that I have a fondness for hearing an individual composer's vision. This is not to say there can't be room for both. I'm in a wait and see mode, I think: it'll be interesting to see what develops.

    The comments to this entry are closed.